I am not Alone

When I wrote my last post on Military medals, I ventured to find out from some of our childhood friends whom we grew up with, what their experiences were with regards to the Military medals.

In retrospect maybe I was just trying to anchor my feelings and redeem the cunning thoughts I used to have when I was a child with regards to these medals, there is safety in numbers, isn’t it?

 

Anyway, when I shared with the group some of the musings I had been having lately, I also asked them:

Question : ‘What did you think of these medals as a child and did you guys(ie your parents) used to keep these medals in any particular way? Did you store them away like we did? ‘

 

The responses were not only varied but quite hilarious. All pointing to the intrigue that these items had in the eyes of a child (notice how I’m protecting myself[icon icon=icon-smile size=14px color=#000 ])

Most of the guys knew the medals were important and this was also defined by the way and place they were stored. There was also intrigue and questions/intentions surrounding the issue of spending the ‘money’.

All I can say is…. I am not alone[icon icon=icon-smile size=14px color=#000 ])

 

NB: Apologies some of the words are in Kiswahili or in ‘Sheng’*…just makes the point more valid

 

Here are the responses…..

Starting with where they were kept

  • Woii woii woii, dn’t even ask or talk.. Those coins were treasured n hidden in a locked briefcase incase you had plans of taking dem away.
  • Dad kept them in a suit case that had many of his prized assets…much like the finance ministers briefcase. wat fascinated me were the shoes that went with ‘the number one dress’!
  • I almost stole that medal that looked like a “Kobole” nikubuy sweets.
  • Dad kept them in his black wooden box.
  • thanks for the changamoto, glad you are all doing fine and dad is smiling from heaven…the medals were safely handled and stored and some of us having followed their footsteps we understand better why the medals were treasured…watoto wetu pia should stay away from our medals. 

 

When they were won:

  • After my dad came back from those parades he never removed them from his coat but he would polish them n warn us not to take them.
  • Number one uniform with shiny boots.

 

Some did the unthinkable (in my view). Unthinkable because had I done what they did.. my backside wouldn’t have seen the light of day for a while…just saying. But fortunately they lived to tell the tale.

 

  • I actually took one and gave to my pal and told my dad i lost it.I had to escape from home for a week to my grandma kwanza nilienda kujificha officers mess karibu na pool,jioni nikahepa kwa granny,it was not easy but finally he gave up on me
  • Memories! I remember my dad refusing me food cz I hd taken the medal.
  •  Hey! i rem those coins kwanza i used to wonder y they were wasting ”money” and i rem my dad would put those special clothes kwa hanger ndani ya paper ya laundry..oooh army lyf

 

In a way, reading those responses made me feel like I had kindred spirits.Granted we were already in the same boat of sorts, but this just took it a notch higher. It’s worth noting that I never dared do some of the things that my friends did, (it’s serious business if you are being hunted or you are denied food because you took the medal-no matter how justified you were). But, I can see how this was possible.

I do however share with them and with many others, the awareness that indeed these were valued items. Whether or not I understood their value at the time, at the very least, I knew not to ‘mess’ with them. Thank goodness for wisdom which comes from growth, or maybe just the fear of being spanked for an indiscretion.

 

Have a great weekend and week ahead!

Cheers,

Mercy

 

*‘Sheng’ is slang language spoken in Kenya. The name and language are derivatives from the Swahili and English languages as well as merging specific letters of the 2 words and derived.

 

**We are counting down days to the launch of our first product…woohoo!!!

 

2 thoughts on “I am not Alone”

  1. Pingback: How do I look? The mounted Medal Box. - Meruti

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